Taos Archaeological Society


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Albuquerque Archaeological Society - The mission of the Albuquerque Archaeological Society is to preserve and protect prehistoric and historic remains in the region; to educate members and the public in archaeological and ethnological fields; to conduct archaeological studies, research, surveys, and excavations; to publish data obtained from research studies; and to cooperate with other scientific institutions.

The Archaeological Conservancy - The Archaeological Conservancy, established in 1980, is the only national non-profit organization dedicated to acquiring and preserving the best of our nation's remaining archaeological sites. Based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, the Conservancy also operates regional offices in Mississippi, Maryland, Ohio, and California.

Archaeological Institute of America - This is your source on the web for daily archaeological news and information.  Forbes magazine has selected this site as "Best of the Web". The Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) is North America's oldest and largest organization devoted to the world of archaeology with more than 8,000 members belonging to 101 local societies in the United States, Canada, and overseas, united by a shared passion for archaeology and its role in furthering human knowledge.

Archaeological Society of New Mexico - The ASNM is one of the oldest of its kind in the United States, with a number of affiliated local societies in the state. ASNM encourages and assists others to unit to preserve, study, protect, and promote appreciation of the prehistoric and historic cultural resources of New Mexico.

American Rock Art Research Association - The American Rock Art Research Association (ARARA) evolved out of the Rock Art Symposium held in 1974 in Farmington. The founding members dedicated the organization to the support of rock art research, conservation, and education.

Blackwater Draw Archaeological Site and Museum - The importance of Blackwater Draw outside Portales was first recognized in 1929 by Ridgely Whiteman. The site has yielded substantial evidence of a human occupation in association with Late Pleistocene fauna, including Columbian mammoth, camel, horse, bison, sabertooth cat and dire wolf. Operated by Eastern New Mexico University, the museum displays items unearthed at the draw.

Center for Desert Archaeology  The Center for Desert Archaeology, a private nonprofit organization, promotes the stewardship of southwestern archaeology and historic resources in the American Southwest and Mexican Northwest through active research, preservation, and public education.

Chaco Culture National Historic Monument - Chaco Culture National Historical Park -- near Nageezi south of Bloomfield -- preserves one of America's richest and most facinating cultural and historic areas. Chaco Canyon was a major center of ancestral Puebloan culture between AD 850 and 1250 -- unlike anything before or since. Chaco is remarkable for its monumental public and ceremonial buildings, and its distinctive architecture.

Dry Gulch Mammoth Site - The Dry Gulch Mammoth Site was discovered in 1987 by a miner who recognized the tip of a tusk in a gully near Ruidoso.

Ellis Museum of Anthropology - Museum at Abiquiu's Ghost Ranch featuring the Gallina Collection, Ghost Ranch Archaeology Collection, North Central New Mexico Ethnographic Collection and Soderberg Santos.

Friends of Archaeology - The Friends of Archaeology is a support committee for the Museum of New Mexico Office of Archaeological Studies, which provides field trips and events throughout the Southwest, lectures, and the annual celebration of archaeology and cuisine of New Mexico, Chiles & Sherds.  Museum of New Mexico Foundation members may join the Friends group at no cost, and events are open to the public.

Maxwell Museum of Anthropology - The Maxwell Museum of Anthropology at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque holds more than 10 million individual items in its archaeological, ethnological, archival, photo and skeletal collections. The collections come from all parts of the world, but have a Southwestern emphasis.

Pottery Southwest - Published for more than 20 years, as perhaps the region's leading publication on pre-Columbian ceramics, Pottery Southwest has now resurfaced in cyberspace.

Salmon Ruins Museum and Research Library - 11th-century Chacoan great house, museum, research library, Native American housing relicas, pioneer homestead, picnic areas outside Bloomfield.

Santa Fe Archaeological Society (SFAS) - Founded in 1900, SFAS is one of the oldest archaeological societies in North America. It became a chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) in 1916, and remains the only AIA chapter in New Mexico.  The purpose of the SFAS is "to promote archaeological research, to stimulate the love of art, and to contribute to the higher culture of the Southwest". 

School for Advanced Research -  The School for Advanced Research, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, was established in Santa Fe, New Mexico in 1907 as a center for the study of the archaeology and ethnology of the American Southwest. Since 1967, the scope of the School's activities has embraced a global perspective through programs to encourage advanced scholarship in anthropology and related social science disciplines and the humanities, and to facilitate the work of Native American scholars and artists.

Traditions of the Sun - Wonderfully done NASA site devoted to the ancient observatories of the world. Site includes extensive, interactive coverage of Chaco Canyon -- ground and aerial photos, maps, Quicktime movies and other features.

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Taos Archaeological Society

PO Box 143

Taos, NM, 87571

Admin@TaosArch.org

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